Friday, May 7, 2021

Crooked Fox Blended Bourbon Review & Tasting Notes

 


The term blended Bourbon used to have a negative connotation. That's because the legal definition of it is unspecific and leaves a lot of wiggle room. Basically, blended Bourbon means that at least 51% must be made from Straight Bourbon. That's up-front. It is that 49% remainder that gets squirrely. You can add artificial coloring, artificial flavors, neutral grain spirits (NGS), younger whiskeys, etc.


Despite that definition, there are some good blended Bourbons that are simply straight and younger Bourbons blended together. This shouldn't suggest there's not pure garbage out there, because that would be untrue. 


One such attempt into the former is called Crooked Fox. It is a blend of 51% straight Bourbon aged at least four years and 49% small-barrel Bourbons aged at least six months. The Bourbons come from both Texas and Kentucky. Crooked Fox is part of the Southern Champion family of spirits out of Carrolton, Texas.


"After carefully maturing (our bourbon) in wooden casks, we go barrel by barrel, selecting the best tasting bourbons to create a whiskey with rich flavors of smoked maple, vanilla, nutmeg, oak, and malted barley with hints of rye. The result is a high-quality whiskey that even the most sophisticated bourbon drinkers will appreciate." - Southern Champion

Packaged at 80°, the label pictures the heads of two foxes, one with a black line over its eyes, the other not. The caption says, "Never trust the eyes you can see. Trust your instinct."  There's not much more information on the label aside from stating it is distilled from grain. You can expect to pay $24.99 for a 750ml bottle. I acquired this from a liquor store, I simply don't remember what state that store was located in.


Time to #DrinkCurious and see what this is all about...


Appearance:  Poured neat in my Glencairn glass, Crooked Fox presented as the color of golden honey. It formed a medium rim on the wall that led to husky, slow legs.


Nose:  This whiskey was not overly fragrant. Aromas of honey, brown sugar, and oak were easier to pick out, and as I kept sniffing, I pulled out orange peel. When I drew the vapor into my mouth, I tasted vanilla. 


Palate:  The mouthfeel was thin and light-bodied. On the front, there was a blend of vanilla with baking spice. The middle consisted of malted milk balls and subtle mint. On the back, flavors of smoked oak and fennel rounded things out.


Finish: Initially, the finish was very short. Additional sips, however, brought a longer experience. Oak, vanilla, and fennel hung around, and then a wave of white pepper rose and fell fairly quickly. It was the only warming component of this whiskey.


Bottle, Bar, or Bust:  This is, simply put, very forgettable. I could see using it for cocktails. As something I'd drink neat (or on the rocks), I wouldn't. Again, not because it was terrible, but pretty much every other choice would be more interesting. I'll be frank - I don't buy whiskeys with the intention of using them as mixers. I'd rather use a good whiskey as a mixer, it would make the rest of the cocktail taste better. Unfortunately, this one takes a Bust.  Cheers!


My Simple, Easy to Understand Rating System
  • Bottle = Buy It
  • Bar = Try it
  • Bust = Leave It

Whiskeyfellow encourages you to enjoy your whiskey as you see fit but begs that you do so responsibly.

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As we should drink in moderation, all comments are subject to it. Cheers!