Showing posts with label Diageo. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Diageo. Show all posts

Wednesday, May 24, 2023

Lagavulin 2023 Distiller's Edition Single Malt Scotch Review

 



This is the final installment in a series of six reviews. The previous in the series can be found here.

 

The distilleries involved are what Diageo refers to as The Six Classic Malts and are comprised of Cragganmore, Dalwhinnie, Glenkinchie, Lagavulin, Oban, and Talisker. Each takes part in the DE program. Today, we’ll explore the 2023 Lagavulin Distiller’s Edition.

 

“Miles and miles of peat bog in the west of the island provide the raw material which imbues the barley with that distinct smoky flavour. Not to mention the rich peaty water that runs down the brown burn from the Solan Lochs and into the distillery. In case you haven’t figured it out, the smoky, peated Lagavulin is seen as the ultimate expression of this region.” - Diageo

 

In 1816, John Johnstone founded the first legal distillery at Lagavulin. There were many illicit ones prior, dating to at least 1742. Then, in 1817, a second distillery called Ardmore (no relation to the distillery that exists today) was built by Archibald Campbell. Ardmore went silent in 1821, and Johnstone purchased it in 1825. He ran them both, but in 1835, Ardmore was shuttered. A year later, Johnstone passed away, and Alexander Graham, a spirits merchant, purchased Lagavulin. Ardmore and Lagavulin merged operations under the name Lagavulin.

 

Graham’s son, Walter, was in charge until he left in 1848 to head up the Laphroaig Distillery. In 1852, Walter’s brother John Crawford Graham assumed control. Then, in 1862, it changed hands again, this time to James Logan Mackie.  

 

In 1878, James hired his nephew Peter. James passed away in 1889, and Peter took the helm, forming Mackie & Co

 

Here’s where things get interesting. In 1908, Peter got his panties in a bunch and built another distillery called Malt Mill. Malt Mill was constructed as a replica of Laphroaig’s distillery. His goal was to duplicate Laphroaig’s whisky. He failed, but Laphroaig sued anyway. The court dismissed Laphroaig’s allegations since Lagavulin utilized a different water source and peat than what Laphroaig used.

 

Peter died in 1924, and Mackie & Co changed its name to White Horse Distillers. Buchanan Dewar Ltd then acquired it, and in 1927, Buchanan Dewar Ltd merged with Distillers Company Limited, which eventually became Diageo.

 

I saved the Lagavulin for last for a few reasons. The main is that it is an Islay Scotch and should be very peaty. The second is anticipation. I love Lagavulin 16, the distillery’s core expression and the base of the DE.

 

Lagavulin 16 is packaged at 43% ABV (86°). The Distiller’s Edition adds a second maturation in Pedro Ximenez (PX)-seasoned American oak casks. This was the third reason; PX is my favorite type of sherry oak in whisky making.

 

PX sherry is made from Spanish white grapes grown around various regions, but primarily from the DenominaciĆ³n de Origen (DO) of Montilla-Moriles, creating a crazily sweet, dark dessert sherry.

 

Lagavulin Distiller’s Edition has a suggested price of $125.00.

 

While I’m about to #DrinkCurious, I realize that I’m potentially setting myself up for disappointment because of the three reasons that I kept this whisky for the last in the series.

 

Before I get there, I must thank Diageo for providing me with a sample in exchange for my no-strings-attached, honest review.

 

Appearance: I served this Scotch neat in a Glencairn glass. The liquid looked like dark bronze and created a microthin rim. Fast, thick tears fell, yet sticky droplets remained.

 

Nose: Peat and seaweed were the first smells I encountered. Aromas of raisins, apricots, caramel, and toffee followed. Salted caramel rolled across my tongue when I breathed through my mouth.  

 

Palate: The silky texture introduced the front of my palate to what I could swear was a caramel-rich, smoky barbeque sauce. Grilled pineapple, raisins, and apricots formed the middle. The back featured brine, tobacco leaf, and dark chocolate.

 

Finish: The finish was unusual, to say the least. It was like an ocean tide. It started with a peaty wave, then faded, and when I thought it would be short, another wave of peat rolled through. Overall, it was long, including flavors of tobacco leaf, dark chocolate, oak, and a distinct saltiness.

 

Bottle, Bar, or Bust: Thankfully, I was not disappointed. The PX influence was obvious. Lagavulin took an already fabulous whisky and added panache. Is this something that a peat newbie can handle? Not likely. But an Islay fan is going to go absolutely bonkers. This 16+-year-old single malt Scotch is worth the price of admission, and I’m sitting here wishing I had another Bottle.

 

As an added bonus, I’ll include notes from my review of Lagavulin 16 since I happen to have a bottle on hand. The tasting notes from my 2020 review of the core whisky are still dead-on:

 

Nose:  There was no mistaking the aroma: Peat, peat, and more peat. But, with a much more mature nose, I discovered brine and sweet caramel beneath all that peat.  When I inhaled through my lips, it was all vanilla cream. 

 

Palate:  My first sip was oily and coated but not what I could describe as heavy. The first thing to strike my palate was, not surprisingly, peat and ash. The best description I can use to tell what I tasted was coffee ice cream. The coffee and vanilla were thick.  Below those, I found brine and seaweed. 

 

Finish:  I found it was very long, smoky, and oaky. But, punching through that was a tasty caramel, chocolate, and toffee mixture similar to a Heath bar.

 

Well, there you have it. I hope you’ve enjoyed reading my reviews of the 2023 Distiller’s Edition whiskies. I know that I relished drinking them. Cheers!

 

My Simple, Easy-to-Understand Rating System

  • Bottle = Buy It
  • Bar = Try It
  • Bust = Leave It

 

Whiskeyfellow encourages you to enjoy your whiskey as you see fit but begs you do so responsibly.

 

Tuesday, May 23, 2023

Dalwhinnie 2023 Distiller's Edition Single Malt Scotch Review

 



This is the fifth in a series of six reviews. The previous in the series can be found here.

 

The distilleries involved are what Diageo refers to as The Six Classic Malts and are comprised of Cragganmore, Dalwhinnie, Glenkinchie, Lagavulin, Oban, and Talisker. Each takes part in the DE program. Today, we’ll explore the 2023 Dalwhinnie Distiller’s Edition.

 

“Made in the highest and coldest working distillery in Scotland, with water from a loch at 2000 feet, Dalwhinnie whisky thrives on extreme conditions – creating a liquid as sweet and accessible as its highland home is remote.” – Diageo

 

The distillery was built in 1897 in the Scottish Highland region in an area called Dalwhinnie, which, in Gaelic, means “the meeting place.” Three major cattle-drove roads met at Dalwhinnie, which provided plenty of opportunity for illicit distillers and smugglers. However, until the distillery was built, no official record of whisky was made at Dalwhinnie. But it likely occurred anyway.

 

The Strathspey Distillery was founded by John Grant, George Sellar, and Alexander Mackenzie. Unfortunately, they weren’t successful, and the distillery went under. Then, in 1905, Strathspey was sold to John Somerville & Co and AP Blyth & Sons, who renamed the distillery Dalwhinnie. Cook & Bernheimer, a US-based company, purchased it a short time later. Dalwhinnie was the first Scotch distillery owned by a foreign entity.

 

In 1919, Dalwhinnie was sold to Macdonald Greenless, which, in turn, was acquired by Distillers Company Limited (DCL) in 1926 under the James Buchanan & Co division. After a series of mergers, DCL became Diageo, which retains ownership today.

 

However, the distillery experienced a fire in 1934 that prevented operations from continuing for four years. Due to the harsh climate (20-foot snowdrifts) and the distillery’s elevation, rebuilding took longer than anticipated. In 1992, the distillery was closed for three years while a major restoration and refitting occurred.  

 

Dalwhinnie 15 is a single malt Scotch and the brand’s core expression. The Distiller’s Edition utilizes Oloroso seasoned, former Bourbon casks for the second maturation cycle. Packaged at 43% ABV (86°), the DE’s suggested retail price is $90.00.

 

Before I #DrinkCurious, I must thank Diageo for providing me with a sample in exchange for my no-strings-attached, honest review. Now, let’s get to it, shall we?

 

Appearance: I served this whisky neat in my Glencairn glass. It presented as a brilliant gold liquid, forming a massive rim and slow, sticky tears.

 

Nose: The aroma was fruity with pineapple, coconut, banana, and orange citrus. That was followed by cocoa, oak, and baking spices. When I drew that air through my lips, I tasted raw honey.

 

Palate: The mouthfeel was thick and creamy. I found sweet pear, pineapple, and honeysuckle on the front of my palate. Then, I encountered bananas, spiced nuts, and toasted coconut in the middle. The back consisted of dry oak, mild smokiness, and pink peppercorn.

 

Finish: The pink peppercorn started so subtly that I almost missed it. But, as I allowed the finish to build, the pepper was more pronounced. The spiced nuts melded nicely, and the muted smoke paired well with those notes. Vanilla, banana, and honeysuckle calmed things. Overall, it was a long duration.

 

Bottle, Bar, or Bust: At 15 years, we understandably enter the realm of more expensive whiskies, so the slightly higher price tag shouldn’t draw unwanted attention. The real question is how the sipping experience went, and the answer is, “Very well.” I preferred a slightly peatier whisky, but what I tasted was enjoyable, and I adored the creamy mouthfeel. I was unshy about taking an additional pour. This Scotch went down a bit too easy, throwing it into what I call a dangerous whisky. And that, my friends, means it earned my coveted Bottle rating. Cheers!

 

My Simple, Easy-to-Understand Rating System

  • Bottle = Buy It
  • Bar = Try It
  • Bust = Leave It

 

Whiskeyfellow encourages you to enjoy your whiskey as you see fit but begs you do so responsibly.

Monday, May 22, 2023

Glenkinchie 2023 Distiller's Edition Single Malt Scotch Review

 


This is the fourth in a series of six reviews. The previous in the series can be found here.

 

The distilleries involved are what Diageo refers to as The Six Classic Malts and are comprised of Cragganmore, Dalwhinnie, Glenkinchie, Lagavulin, Oban, and Talisker. Each takes part in the DE program. Today, we’ll explore the 2023 Glenkinchie Distiller’s Edition.

 

“Glenkinchie is just fifteen miles from the capital, earning it the title ‘The Edinburgh Malt.’ But it’s strange to think of that dark and distinguished city when you see fields of barley or the green Lammermuir Hills rolling north towards the Firth of Forth. Stranger still when you taste the subtle, floral flavour of this rare Lowland survivor.” - Diageo

 

If you’ve ever tried Johnnie Walker, then you’ve had Glenkinchie. It is one of four Diageo distilleries found in each Johnnie Walker expression, the other three being Cardhu, Clynelish, and Caol Ila.

 

Glenkinchie was founded in 1837 by brothers John and George Rate in East Lothian. There is some dispute over the exact date, as record-keeping was imperfect, and the brothers had founded a distillery called  Milton in 1825. Some claim the Milton and Glenkinchie distilleries to have been the same. In contrast, others suggest these were in two different locations. Other factors, such as extensive illegal operations in the area, contribute to the uncertainty.

 

In 1853, the brothers went bankrupt, and the distillery became a sawmill. Just shy of three decades later, the mill was mothballed, and a group of investors led by Major James Grey restored and expanded the distillery and reboot operations. Whisky flowed freely, and in 1914, Glenkinchie formed an alliance with three other Lowland distilleries: Rosebank, St. Magdalene, Grange, and Clydesdale. They called it Scottish Mark Distillers. In 1925, the group merged with Distillers Company Limited, which eventually became Diageo. However, it wasn’t until 1998 that Glenkinchie became a single malt Scotch brand!

 

Glenkinchie sources water from Lammermuir Hills Spring and utilizes lightly-peated barley for its distillate. Its core offering is Glenkinchie 12-Year, packaged at 43% ABV (86°). The Distiller’s Edition adds a second maturation in Amontillado-seasoned American oak casks and a suggested price of $85.00.

 

Amontillado is a darker, dry sherry made from Palomino grapes and originates from the Montilla-Moriles region of Spain. It is aged at least two years and typically offers a nutty flavor.

 

I’m about to #DrinkCurious, but before I do, I must thank Diageo for providing me with a sample in exchange for my no-strings-attached, honest review.

 

Appearance: I served this Scotch neat in a Glencairn glass. Its color was somewhere between sunflower yellow and topaz, continually morphing as I changed the angle of the glass. A bold rim formed massive, wavy tears.

 

Nose: The wine's influence was unmistakable as I poured it into my glass. It was as if I opened a bottle of white grape juice. Inside, I smelled citrus, honey, roasted nuts, and oak. I found apples and vanilla when I pulled the vapor through my lips.  

 

Palate: This whisky’s texture was creamy and relatively thick. Vanilla, toasted nuts, and dried apricots were on the front. The middle featured honey, white grapes, and bananas. I experienced oak tannins, lightly-smoked peat, and orange peel on the back.   

 

Finish: Dark chocolate and roasted nuts competed with smoky peat and oak. The oak was the last to fade; overall, it was a medium-long duration.

 

Bottle, Bar, or Bust: The 2023 Distiller’s Edition was my introduction to Glenkinchie’s single malt. I love Lowland whiskies; admittedly, the peat was not what I planned for. That’s fine; it was a lovely surprise. At the same time, I was expecting a far drier whisky based on the Amontillado maturation, and that didn’t materialize. However, this was very much an enjoyable pour. I prefer it was slightly less expensive, but that’s not enough to discount my Bottle rating. Cheers!

 

My Simple, Easy-to-Understand Rating System

  • Bottle = Buy It
  • Bar = Try It
  • Bust = Leave It

 

Whiskeyfellow encourages you to enjoy your whiskey as you see fit but begs you do so responsibly.

 


Friday, May 19, 2023

Talisker 2023 Distiller's Edition Single Malt Scotch Review


This is the third in a series of six reviews. For the previous installment, click here 

 

The distilleries involved in the Distiller's Edition program are what Diageo refers to as The Six Classic Malts and are comprised of CragganmoreDalwhinnieGlenkinchieLagavulinOban, and Talisker. Each takes part in the DE program. Today, we’ll explore the 2023 Talisker Distiller’s Edition.

 

"From the rugged western shores of the Isle of Skye comes a richly flavored, maritime malt, with a warming afterglow. So easy to enjoy, yet like Skye itself, so hard to leave." - Diageo 

 

Talisker was founded in 1830 by Hugh and Kenneth MacAskill on the Isle of Skye. Kenneth passed away in 1854, with his share passed to Hugh, who died in 1863. The distillery was inherited by son-in-law Donald MacLennan. Unfortunately, Donald became insolvent, and all his assets, including the distillery, were confiscated. 

 

But wait, there’s more. In 1968, J.R.W. Anderson assumed control. He was arrested and charged with fraud and subsequently had to declare bankruptcy and lost everything, including, you guessed it, the distillery. 

 

Talisker was acquired by a partnership of lawyer Alexander Grigor Allan, wine and spirit merchant Roderick Kemp, and the owners of the Glenlossie Distillery. Together, they retrofitted and upgraded the distillery. Then, in 1889 a fire destroyed Talisker’s grain stores. The partnership dissolved in 1892. 

 

In 1898, assets were purchased by Dailuaine-Talisker Distilleries Ltd., which, in turn, went to a partnership of John Dewar &  Sons  Ltd., James   Buchanan  & Company  Ltd., The   Distillers  Company Limited, and John Walker & Sons Ltd. In 1925, the partnership simply became The Distillers Company Limited. The distillery was then shut in 1941 due to World War II. 

 

Talisker reopened in 1945 and remained productive until a fire in 1960 destroyed it. The owners quickly rebuilt, going as far as to duplicate the original stills, and then resumed production in 1962. It has continued operations since.   

 

Talisker's flagship single malt Scotch is Talisker 10. The Distiller’s Edition utilizes Amoroso-seasoned American oak casks for the finishing process. Amoroso is created by blending Oloroso and Pedro Ximenez sherries. Packaged at 45.8% ABV (91.6°), the Distiller’s Edition has a suggested price of $85.00.

 

Before I #DrinkCurious, I must thank Diageo for providing me with a sample in exchange for my no-strings-attached, honest review. Let’s get to it.

 

Appearance: I poured this Scotch into my Glencairn glass to sip neat. The bronze whisky formed a thicker rim that produced quick, straight legs.

 

Nose: The smell of the ocean blended with peat that reminded me of a beach barbeque. Pineapple, orange citrus, raisin, and nuts followed. When I inhaled through my mouth, I found rich vanilla and a kiss of smoke.

 

Palate: The texture was thin and slightly oily. Initially, I tasted cocoa powder, vanilla cream, and bananas. I encountered salted pineapple, golden raisins, and green apples as the liquid moved to the middle of my palate. The back was typical Talisker with black pepper and smoky oak, joined by roasted almonds.  

 

Finish: Salted pineapple, smoky oak, and cocoa powder remained in my mouth, but out of nowhere came a heavy punch of caramel. The peat was somewhat muted. Overall, it was a longer duration.

 

Bottle, Bar, or Bust: I’m a fan of Talisker 10; I always have been. And, as much as I enjoy that, I believe the Distiller’s Edition eclipsed it. I love PX influences, and the nutty Oloroso added an exciting aspect to my tasting experience. The addition took a great whisky and made it even better. I’d buy this one all day long, and as such, it snags my Bottle rating.    

 

Now, just for fun (and because I have a bottle of it on hand), I wanted to experience how the DE differed from the standard 10-Year. Below is from my 2021 review, and I didn’t find anything I’d revise.

 

Appearance:  Poured neat in my Glencairn glass, Talisker 10 presented as brassy in color. It created a medium rim but heavy, thick legs that crashed back into the pool. 

 

Nose:  While I allowed the whisky to rest, its sweet, peaty aroma left the glass. Peat was joined with seaweed, brine, a faint astringent, raisin, citrus, nutmeg, and vanilla. As I inhaled the vapor into my mouth, it was malty.  

 

Palate:  The mouthfeel was oily and medium-bodied. On the front, the sweet peat married honey, vanilla, and milk chocolate. Mid-palate turned fruity with apples, pears, and green grapes. That was joined by malt.  The back consisted of charred oak, black pepper, and saline. 

 

Finish:  The long finish featured clove, black pepper, smoke, brine, and vanilla. There was no burning sensation to speak of, making it easy to pick out the notes. 

 

Cheers!

 

My Simple, Easy-to-Understand Rating System

  • Bottle = Buy It
  • Bar = Try It
  • Bust = Leave It

 

Whiskeyfellow encourages you to enjoy your whiskey as you see fit but begs you do so responsibly.

 


 

Thursday, May 18, 2023

Oban 2023 Distiller's Edition Single Malt Scotch Review

 


This is the second in a series of six reviews. For the previous installment, click here 

 

The distilleries involved in the Distiller's Edition program are what Diageo refers to as The Six Classic Malts and are comprised of Cragganmore, Dalwhinnie, Glenkinchie, Lagavulin, Oban, and Talisker. Each takes part in the DE program. Today, we’ll explore the 2023 Oban Distiller’s Edition.

 

“Row just a few metres out to sea, and you can fit the entire town of Oban within the single frame of a camera. And the distillery is just a speck inside that image. 

Oban is one of the smallest whisky makers in Scotland. And that’s key to the character of our products. When expansion isn’t an option and the volume we’re able to produce is limited, we stand on quality, authenticity, and heritage.” - Diageo

 

The Oban Distillery was founded in Little Bay by brothers John and Hugh Stevenson in 1794. The duo built it at what is now the West Highland Scottish port city of Oban; however, the distillery preceded it. The Stevensons sold the distillery to Peter Curnstie in 1866, who, in turn, sold it to Walter Higgin in 1883. Higgin was upgrading the distillery when workers stumbled upon ten people's thousands of years old remains!

 

Then, in 1898, Alexander Edward purchased it from Higgin, adding it to his portfolio that included the Aultmore and Craigellachie distilleries. Serious financial complications occurred, and in 1925, John Dewar & Sons purchased the distillery, which then became part of Distillers Company Limited. In 1931, Oban was shut down, only to be resurrected in 1937. It happened again in 1969, reopening in 1972 with a new stillhouse and without its malting floors. In 1999, the distillery was acquired by United Distillers & Vintners, which became the spirits division of Diageo, fully converting in 2004.

 

Oban has only two pot stills and is the second-smallest distillery in the Diageo group. Almost 90% of what it produces winds up on the US market! It is also one of only 16 Scottish distilleries that use worm tubs. Oban’s is a one-of-a-kind that employs two worms nested within each other.

 

Its core expression is a 14-year-old single malt; everything the distillery releases is 43% ABV (86°). The DE adds the extra maturation in a former Montilla Fino cask, which is a fortified Spanish white wine. The suggested retail price is $95.00.

 

I’m about to #DrinkCurious, but before I do, I must thank Diageo for providing me with a sample in exchange for my no-strings-attached, honest review.

 

Appearance: I served this Scotch neat in a Glencairn glass. The deep, brassy liquid created a thin rim that shed a thick curtain of tears.

 

Nose: Oban 14 DE may have the most wine-forward aroma I’ve experienced in a single malt Scotch. I smelled white grapes, pineapple, orange peel, and honey. When I pulled the air into my mouth, it was salted vanilla.  

 

Palate: A creamy texture revealed a lightly smoky, salty taste on my palate's front. Midway through, I tasted vanilla and honey-roasted peanuts. The back consisted of rich caramel, chocolate, and a touch of mint.

 

Finish: Medium-to-long in duration, the finish consisted of salted caramel, muted mint, chocolate, and peanuts.

 

Bottle, Bar, or Bust: It has been a while since I’ve had a whisky with a good salty influence. The lightly-peated character meshed well with its fruitiness. Peanut is a flavor that I don’t often find in Scotch whiskies. It complimented the chocolate and caramel, giving it a dessert quality. I believe Oban has a winner with its 2023 Distiller’s Edition, and my Bottle rating should be no surprise. Cheers!

 

My Simple, Easy-to-Understand Rating System

  • Bottle = Buy It
  • Bar = Try It
  • Bust = Leave It

 

Whiskeyfellow encourages you to enjoy your whiskey as you see fit but begs you do so responsibly.

 


Wednesday, May 17, 2023

Cragganmore 2023 Distiller's Edition Single Malt Scotch Review

 


This is the first in a series of six reviews.

 

Since 1996, several of Diageo’s Scotch distilleries have offered limited Distiller’s Edition (DE) whiskies. The idea behind the DE program is to take a distillery’s fully-matured core expression and transfer it to a second, fortified wine cask for a month to impart additional characteristics.

 

Some purists dislike the idea of barrel finishing, believing the purpose is to hide defects of inferior whiskies. While that can happen, in the case of the annual DE program, the core expressions are already tried and true releases.

 

Another aspect is to keep these whiskies affordable, which many other brands often overlook with their limited editions, purposefully or not.

 

The distilleries involved are what Diageo refers to as The Six Classic Malts and are comprised of Cragganmore, Dalwhinnie, Glenkinchie, Lagavulin, Oban, and Talisker. Each takes part in the DE program. Today, we’ll explore the 2023 Cragganmore Distiller’s Edition.

 

“Cragganmore takes its rock face of a name from the mountain in whose shadow its distillery sits. And this is a whisky with many high approaches and hidden valleys of flavour. Known as the most complex aroma on Speyside, it must also be one of the most delightful because the distillery can’t keep up with demand.” - Diageo

 

Cragganmore was established in 1869 by John Smith, son of George Smith, who founded The Glenlivet. John had worked at his father’s distillery as well as at Macallan and Glenfarclas. Cragganmore has the distinction of being the first to transport its whiskies by railroad. The distillery draws water from the Craggan Burn by Ballindollach. It is a Speyside distillery and uses lightly-peated barley to create its distillate.

 

Cragganmore’s core expression is aged 12 years in former Bourbon barrels. The DE utilizes re-charred, Port-seasoned casks. It is bottled at 40% ABV (80°) and carries a suggested retail price of $85.00.

 

I’m about to #DrinkCurious, but before I do, I must thank Diageo for providing me with a sample in exchange for my no-strings-attached, honest review.

 

Appearance: I poured this Scotch into my Glencairn glass to sip neat. The copper-colored liquid formed a medium rim on the wall, releasing widely-spaced, thick, sticky tears.  

 

Nose: The aroma smelled of honeysuckle, rose petals, melon, green grapes, and pear. Drawing the air through my lips was reminiscent of honey and apple.

 

Palate: The medium-heavy texture coated every nook and cranny of my mouth. Brown sugar, vanilla, and sweet apple flavors were on the front of my palate, whereas the middle featured chocolate, plum, and caramel. The back revealed smoky oak, nutmeg, and cocoa.

 

Finish: Medium-to-long in duration, the ingredients of the finish included cocoa, nutmeg, smoked vanilla, and caramel.

 

Bottle, Bar, or Bust: Despite being 40% ABV, the 2023 Cragganmore DE is a potent pour. There’s nothing you’d mistake as “watered down” and, instead, is full of character. It even gave my hard palate a light sizzle. The peat is gentle and unmistakable but doesn’t even approach overwhelming. It would be a tremendous toe-dipping opportunity for those who are peat-curious. The more seasoned Scotch enthusiast will find this Speyside malt intriguing.

 

I found myself refilling my glass a few times, both in an attempt to dig deeper and because I was enjoying the heck out of it. I believe it is reasonably priced and am happy to have this in my whisky library. It earns every iota of my Bottle rating. Cheers!

 

My Simple, Easy-to-Understand Rating System

  • Bottle = Buy It
  • Bar = Try It
  • Bust = Leave It

 

Whiskeyfellow encourages you to enjoy your whiskey as you see fit but begs you do so responsibly.